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Displaying records 1 through 11 of 11 found.

A Community Toolkit for Addressing Health Misinformation (2021). Resource Type: Toolkit. Description: Health center providers have likely encountered patients who were reluctant to receive the COVID-19 vaccine due to false, inaccurate, or misleading information. This resource can help to ensure that people across the country have access to science-based public health guidance as the country continues to confront the pandemic. The toolkit is interactive and collaborative, using simple language and examples to help patients understand and identify misinformation and disinformation. More Details...

Sharing COVID-19 Vaccine Information Through Social Media (2021). Resource Type: Archived Webinar. Description: This live session will help prepare nurses to share information and stories on social media. We’ll walk through the basics of individual social media channels as well as best practices for sharing your own content and engaging with others’. More Details...

Protect Yourself and Your Family: In-language COVID-19 PSAs and Digital Media (2021). Resource Type: Toolkit. Description: This toolkit provides PSAs in English, Chinese, and Vietnamese to inform audience to Get Vaccinated, Get Tested, Answer my COVID-19 Questions, Protect Myself and My Community, Access Healthcare Safely, Find food resources, Get language assistance for Medicare, Wear your mask properly, Learn about vaccine safety, Live life safely, and Avoid Vaccine Scams. More Details...

COM Talks: Crisis Communications (2020). Resource Type: Online Self-Paced Learning Modules. Description: As part of the COVID-19 Supplemental Funding activities for the Virginia Community Healthcare Association’s 330 Work Plan, the Association has been producing live learning sessions via Zoom at least once a month for health center communications and outreach staff. In each session, a contracted subject matter expert covers a communications and outreach topic pertinent to COVID-19 and crisis/emergency communications. Sessions so far have included Crisis Communications Planning, Outreach Strategies for Vulnerable Populations During a Crisis, and Myth Busting Strategies to Promote Truth Online. Session recordings are available on the Association’s on-demand training platform, the Community Health Center Learning Library. More Details...

Toolkit on Response to Racism and Xenophobia — COVID-19 (2020). Resource Type: Toolkit. Description: The National Council of Asian Pacific Americans (NCAPA), in collaboration with the Association of Asian Pacific Community Health Organizations, developed a COVID-19 Response Toolkit to address incidents of xenophobia, racism, and hate in the Asian American (AA) and Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander (NHPI) community. More Details...

HITEQ Highlights: Getting Started with a Social Media Strategy for HIV Prevention and Care (2020). Resource Type: Archived Webinar . Description: Join the HITEQ Center for a webinar on how to develop a social media strategy to improve your health center’s HIV prevention and care outreach. Using the POST (People, Objectives, Strategy, Technology) method, attendees learned how to use social media more efficiently to reach your target audiences. We also reviewed social media platforms including Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, their uses and differences. Attendees received recommendations for social media management and graphic design tools at the end of the discussion. More Details...

General & Basic Operations for Clinical Leaders (eLearning) (2019). Resource Type: Online Self-Paced Learning Modules. Description: This eLearning module discusses the importance of general and basic operations as part of a clinical leader's core competency development, and demonstrates examples of useful resources and activities a clinical leader can use to enhance their ability to:demonstrate the ability to work fluidly with governmental units and other funding sources that support health centers; demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the unique dynamics of the health center model; leverage marketing opportunities and social media to continuously enhance the health center's image within the community and among external constituencies; continuously build knowledge and expertise through industry networks; effectively assist or provide oversight in Uniform Data System (UDS) report completion; demonstrate effective leadership qualities; actively guide the clinical team toward patient self-management and true patient-centered,integrated care, wellness and health promotion; and demonstrate advanced proficiency in office technologies More Details...

Managing Online Patient Engagement (2018). Resource Type: Publication. Description: An integral component of health center practice operations is patient engagement. Whether patient engagement is done over the phone, in person at the health center, via patient portals or online, health centers need to be prepared to provide a positive patient experience. However, managing patient expectations about online engagement can present challenges. More Details...

Effective Social Media Management for Health Centers: Infographic Poster (2018). Resource Type: Publication. Description: Maintaining a good name in the digital era is becoming increasingly important as social media tools and platforms continue to expand the services they offer. As a health center, having a professional social media presence is becoming an influential channel in which to engage patient populations. Maintaining a good name in the digital era is becoming increasingly important as social media tools and platforms continue to expand the services they offer. As a health center, having a professional social media presence is becoming an influential channel in which to engage patient populations. These channels enable physicians and health groups to communicate and share information quickly while reaching millions of people. However, these same channels and other social media activities also create new challenges for the patient-physician relationship. In the current health care environment, health centers often don’t have the time or resources to effectively manage their own social media presence.  The HITEQ Center has gathered this brief list of tips and resources to help health centers get started with managing and maintaining a professional and engaging social media presence for their health center. Think Before You Post Above all else, make sure that you are complying with all privacy and security requirements before you post to social media. It is better to be slow in responding, rather than unknowingly violating HIPAA regulations. Have 2-3 people review a post before submitting. When dealing with patient information, be cognizant of the standards of patient privacy and confidentiality just as you would in any other context. There are boundaries to the patient-physician relationship that must be maintained—online and off. Never post identifiable patient information online and monitor your own internet presence to ensure that personal and professional information are kept separate. Also, be wary of inadvertently committing an act that constitutes medical malpractice. The National Association of Community Health Center’s NACHC guide to social media and medical malpractice relates two main areas of concern when it comes to social media, technology, and medical malpractice: 1 Committing an act that constitutes potential malpractice; and 2 the impact of social media use on a potential or pending malpractice proceeding. Know Your Audience Understanding your audience is key if you want to ensure patient and stakeholder engagement. The message you want to disseminate should resonate with your target audience. NACHC’s guide to Social Media for Health Centers relates that it is important to not stray too far from the types of topics that brought people to your site in the first place.  Try to understand how a user might receive your message if you want it to stick. Doing so can help you engage with past, current, and potential patients through meaningful and relevant content. This can encourage discussions and build credibility. Understanding your audience is also a great way to get to know your patients and stakeholders; it can help you learn about their experiences with the health center, identify their pain points, and uncover new ways to improve care. Engage Your Population Respond to all messages, including both praise and criticism. As Dr. John Halamka writes, “We don’t make excuses. We try to take it offline as soon as we can. We send a direct message to the reviewer.” Customer service shouldn’t stop when you go online. Developing an online relationship with patients and stakeholders is critical in upholding your health center’s values in customer service and relations. Enhancing online communication between the physician and patient is one way to maintain that relationship. This means responding to their comments and questions, especially if it’s a complaint, is a professional and timely manner. Immediately connect with the user to resolve the issue. Practice Quality Having a social media presence comes with the responsibility to report violating content. The AMA writes that if you “see content posted by colleagues that appears unprofessional… bring that content to the attention of the individual, so that he or she can remove it and/or take other appropriate actions.” Also, recognize that your own actions online and the content you post may negatively affect you or your health center’s reputation. Be aware of the consequences and how they can undermine your reputation and public trust. More Details...

HITEQ Health App Decision Tree: A tool developed In collaboration with the Children's Health Fund to help choose appropriate Health Apps (2017). Resource Type: Publication. Description: There are thousands of consumer health applications health apps, which run on smartphones, watches, tablets, and other mobile devices. These Health Apps are available for download for general consumers, patients, and healthcare professionals. Currently, there is no governmental agency that provides certification or guidance on health apps, although there are several projects from organizations such as HL7, the FDA, ONC, and OCR that are working to provide guidance. User discrepancy in terms of the validity and safety of the health apps they choose to use are primarily based on ratings or recommendations. This guide seeks to provide a health app decision tree that can assist medical professionals and consumers in making wise choices when using health apps. There are thousands of consumer health applications health apps, which run on smartphones, watches, tablets, and other mobile devices. These health apps are available for download for general consumers, patients, and healthcare professionals. Currently, there is no governmental agency that provides certification or guidance on health apps, although there are several projects from organizations such as HL7, the FDA, ONC, and OCR that are working to provide guidance. User discrepancy in terms of the validity and safety of the health apps they choose to use are primarily based on ratings or recommendations. This guide seeks to provide a health app decision tree that can assist medical professionals and consumers in making wise choices when using health apps. The Children's Health Fund was made aware of a use case in which a health app that was targeted for use by adults was used for a child and consequently caused a detrimental health issue. Currently there are no certifying bodies for consumer-oriented health apps and consequently many doctors must navigate this domain themselves. This guide seeks to provide a health app decision tree that can assist medical professionals and consumers in making wise choices when using health apps. Download the decision tree below. More Details...

How to Effective Manage Social Media within the Health Center Setting: A HITEQ infographic of key principles (2016). Resource Type: Publication. Description: This article written by Dr. John Halamka, CIO at Harvard Medical School and a Health IT adoption thought-leader, provides examples from the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center on best practices for healthcare providers in trying to manage social media efforts. This article written by Dr. John Halamka, CIO at Harvard Medical School and a Health IT adoption thought-leader, provides examples from the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center BIDMC on best practices for healthcare providers in trying to manage social media efforts. Topics covered include communication strategies, responding to positive and negative comments, and staff awareness. These topics, while garnered from Mr. Halamka's experience with being CIO for BIDMC  are discussed in a way that is relevant to all health care settings, including health centers. Included in this article are straightforward policies or concepts that are easily adopted into an organization's social media policies no matter what their size. Click on the link below to gain access to the related article... More Details...

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $6,625,000 with 0 percentage financed with non-governmental sources. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government. For more information, please visit HRSA.gov.