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Displaying records 1281 through 1300 of 1442 found.

Federal Food Assistance in the Event of a Disaster: An Emergency Preparedness Resource (Spanish) (2018). Resource Type: Publication. Description: Information about available food assistance after a major disaster. More Details...

Federal Food Assistance in the Event of a Disaster: An Emergency Preparedness Resource (Haitian Creole) (2018). Resource Type: Publication. Description: Information about available food assistance after a major disaster. More Details...

Examples of Technical Assistance Provided by Primary Care Associations and Health Center Controlled Networks: How HCCN’s and PCA’s can be helpful to Quality staff at a Health Center (2017). Resource Type: Publication. Description: Examples of Technical Assistance Provided by Primary Care Associations and Health Center Controlled Networks This document showcases Primary Care Associations (PCAs) and Health Center Controlled Networks (HCCNs) for five states, highlighting their work in Quality and Health IT.  These are examples of the types of assistance any health center may find from their own PCA and HCCN. HRSA provides funding to PCAs and HCCNs to provide state and regional resources to assist health centers. More Details...

Examination of Health Conditions of Enabling Service Users: Enabling Services Accountability Project (2005). Resource Type: Publication. Description: This factsheet outlines results from a study conducted examining the health conditions of enabling service (ES) users. The study provides an essential foundation for future ES studies that examine health outcomes for specific conditions. By examining ES and their measurable effects on health, we can begin to develop funding and reimbursement strategies to pay for these essential and currently non-reimbursed services at health centers nationwide. More Details...

Evaluation Of Culturally Appropriate Community Health Education On Diabetes Outcomes (2008). Resource Type: Publication. Description: This fact sheet provides the results of a study that examined the impact of health education utilization on HbA1c levels of diabetic patients at Waianae Coast Comprehensive Health Center (WCCHC). The results showed that health education visits are associated with improved HbA1c levels, and thus are essential to patient health care. This demonstrates that culturally and linguistically appropriate health education services are integral components of health center care for underserved populations and serve as effective tools to reduce barriers to care and diabetes health disparities. More Details...

Estimating Capital Project Costs for Health Centers (2013). Resource Type: Publication. Description: This publication outlines the main components of a capital project budget and provides assistance in estimating top-line construction costs, based on the review of approximately 500 community health center capital projects from 2010-2013. More Details...

Establishing Policies And Building Capacity Of Community Health Centers To Address Human Trafficking (2015). Resource Type: Publication. Description: This educational brief gives an overview of the health disparities facing victims of human trafficking and how health centers are an essential resource uniquely situated to help victims. This brief includes recommendations for training staff members to recognize sex trafficking victims, policies/procedures to support patients who were being trafficked, and other federal anti-trafficking resources. More Details...

Enhancing Health Center & Housing Authority Partnerships with AmeriCorps VISTA (2017). Resource Type: Archived Webinar. Description: This webinar describes the AmeriCorps VISTA program and the ways in which VISTA members can support health center and housing authority partnerships. More Details...

Engaging Youth Experiencing Homelessness (2016). Resource Type: Publication. Description: The large numbers of young people experiencing homelessness in the United States each year are at significant risk of diseases, injuries and developmental delays that can impair their functioning, potentially for their entire lives. Moreover, engaging them in services can be difficult for a variety of legal, psychological, and practical reasons. Wanting to minimize the risks faced by these young people, to improve their health status, and to help them avoid a lifetime of homelessness, Health Care for the Homeless (HCH) and other service providers have developed various strategies for engaging homeless youth in systems of care. This publication describes practices and services that HCH agencies have found to be helpful in engaging youth experiencing homelessness. More Details...

Engaging the Data Creators: Involving Front-Line Staff in the Health IT Enabled QI Process (2016). Resource Type: Publication. Description: This brief discusses the importance of including frontline staff such as front desk, intake staff, and medical assistants in Health IT Enabled QI process, as they are often the ‘data creators’ or the ones entering the information into the system. Real world examples as well as suggested approaches and further resources are included. The data that is generated within health centers through entry into the EHR or practice management system and used for myriad purposes such as decision support, reporting, and quality improvement is often input by front-line staff. This may include front desk staff who enter information on intake forms, medical assistants who enter height, weight, and vital signs, among others. Another way to look at it is the information that health center leadership, providers, and payers are using to make decisions is often ‘created’ by entry level staff that may have less training and higher turnover. For these reasons, it is critically important to consider these ‘data creators’ in quality improvement activities that are undertaken. More Details...

Engaging Staff and Community in Defining Your Capital Project (2013). Resource Type: Publication. Description: This publication offers tools and techniques to solicit valuable input from health center staff and community members to inform the design of a capital project. More Details...

Engaging and Supporting LGBTQ Youth and Families: Best Practices and Important Considerations for Health Centers (2017). Resource Type: Publication. Description: This document provides health centers with strategies of engaging and keeping lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning adolescents in care as well as engaging and supporting families of LGBTQ adolescents. More Details...

Endocrinology TeleECHO Clinic: Endo ECHO (n.a.). Resource Type: Online Self-Paced Learning Modules. Description: The Endocrinology TeleECHO Clinic (Endo ECHO) trains and supports primary care providers in rural and underserved communities to improve their knowledge of and skill in the care and management of patients with endocrinologic needs. Issues like complex diabetes, thyroid disease, adrenal and pituitary disorders, hypogonadism, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS), hyperlipidemia, metabolic bone disorders and transgender health are discussed weekly in a community of practice with a team of experts. More Details...

Encrypting Data at Rest on Servers: Implications for Health Centers (2016). Resource Type: Publication. Description: It is common practice today to encrypt data at rest, that is, data stored on servers. This is especially applicable to health centers who are less frequently actively transporting data across disparate networks. Like many smaller healthcare organizations, Health Centers are particularly vulnerable to potential attack and infiltration by data hackers for several reasons: they tend to have fewer technical support staff, resource limitations make it harder to assess, implement, and maintain safe data practices, and organizational inertia limits preventive action when no threat is perceived.  It is common practice today to encrypt data at rest, that is, data stored on servers. Like many smaller healthcare organizations, Federally Qualified Health Centers FQHC are particularly vulnerable to potential attack and infiltration by data hackers for several reasons: they tend to have fewer technical support staff, resource limitations make it harder to assess, implement, and maintain safe data practices, and organizational inertia limits preventive action when no threat is perceived. To build off an old adage, no one ever got fired for encrypting their data. But what protection does that really provide? Is just encrypting data enough? First, let’s distinguish between three methods for encrypting data at rest. Full-disk encryption. Most modern operating systems like Linux or Windows Server provide the capability to encrypt their disks in their entirety. This is accomplished with symmetric encryption whereby there is a key or passphrase that a computer operator has to enter when the disks are encrypted and when the system boots to allow access to the data. Typically, the password must be manually entered on the physical server console, though some virtualized and cloud-based environments offer remote passphrase entry and varying degrees of passphrase management and automation. With full-disk encryption, software installed on the server does not need to know or do anything special to operate normally: the operating system provides transparent access to the encrypted data as necessary with very little performance loss. But note that the initial encryption needs to be done on a new disk or set of disks as an existing disk will be wiped clean in the process. So it’s easiest to do this during an initial deployment or migration to a new server. File system encryption. Physical disks are typically divided into one or more file systems by the operating system.  As an alternative to full-disk encryption, file system encryption allows administrators to encrypt only selected file systems or even just selected folders within file systems. This makes it possible to configure a server than can boot without a passphrase; and then require a passphase only after the system is up and running and needs to access its encrypted file systems.  Similar to full-disk encryption, the encryption is transparently provided to applications by the operating system.  Unlike full-disk encryption, developers and administrators need to be careful not to store sensitive files on non-encrypted file systems. Database encryption.  Another way to encrypt data at rest is at the database level: The database software Oracle, SQL Server can provide application-level encryption. Like operating system level encryption, a key or passphrase is entered by an operator when the database starts up, after which all database operations access the encrypted data transparently hence the name: Both Oracle and Microsoft SQL Server call the feature “Transparent Data Encryption”. For servers that may store sensitive data in files outside the database, this provides less protection than encrypting the entire file system, but likely protects the most sensitive data on the system. What kind of protection does encrypting data at rest really provide? Here are a few salient points: Benefits of Encrypting Data at Rest First and foremost, encrypting data at rest protects the organization from the physical theft of the file system storage devices which is why end-user mobile devices from laptops to cell phones should always be encrypted. While this might sound unlikely, the physical disk devices are only as secure as the data center where they are located. While data center access control policy is usually quite strict, in practice it can be quite lax. Door entry can employ weak precautions like old push-button unlock devices, and the proliferation of easily-swappable modular disks for quick maintenance makes removing a disk quite easy. Encrypting data at rest can protect the organization from unauthorized access to data when computer hardware is sent for repair or discarded. Encrypting data at rest can help to satisfy information security or regulatory requirements such as the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard PCI DSS or the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act HIPAA. In some deployments, the actual file system where data resides is somewhat disconnected from the server upon which applications are loaded either through the use of a storage area network SAN or cloud-based storage. This introduces the possibility that an intruder could break in to the storage subsystem but not the rest of the system. Encrypting the storage subsystem can protect against such attacks. Limitations of Encrypting Data at Rest Encryption of data at rest provides little protection against intrusions in which a hacker gains remote privileged access to a running server in which the passphrase has already been entered. Even more so, if the applications that access the encrypted files or databases web applications, query systems are not themselves secured, a hacker who penetrates one of these applications gains access to the data, whether it is encrypted or not. For database encryption, note that some database management systems only support data encryption in more advanced read more expensive versions of the software. When full-disk encryption is enabled on a physical non-virtualized server, remember that an operator – a human being – will need to type the passphrase into a console whenever the system starts up. For database-level encryption, the passphrase will need to be entered when the database starts up. While this intervention increases the level of protection, it is at the expense of convenience, as systems cannot reboot automatically without a passphrase or even without someone actually being in the server room which can be especially inconvenient if the system manager is not collocated with the hardware. File system encryption can mitigate some of these startup issues. And, of course, if that passphrase is ever lost your data will be encrypted forever. Special Considerations for Virtualized and Cloud-based Environments As mentioned, some virtualized and cloud-based environments offer remote passphrase entry and varying degrees of passphrase management and automation for full-disk encryption – but be aware that there is often a tradeoff between convenience and security with automated solutions. For example, if a cloud provider keeps your passphrase and automatically provides it to the operating system at boot time, the level of security offered by the full-disk encryption solution is largely dependent on how securely the cloud provider manages the passphrase. While encrypting data at rest can be a useful component in a data security toolbox, it must be implemented with a full understanding of the protection it does and does not provide. Organizations should consult with their vendors, data security staff, system staff, and application staff to determine an appropriate set of actions to secure institutional data. More Details...

Enabling Services: Gateways to Better Care (2016). Resource Type: Publication. Description: This fact sheet was developed by AAPCHO and the National Association for Community Health Centers (NACHC). It provides an overview of the leading role health centers play in providing enabling services, or non-clinical services that improve access to care, and the important and positive impacts these services can have on health outcomes, costs, access and patient satisfaction. More Details...

Enabling Services Data Collection Implementation Packet: Enabling Services Accountability Project (2017). Resource Type: Toolkit. Description: This toolkit includes tools and recommendations for how health centers can better capture data on enabling services (ES). This will help health centers provide a better understanding of the role of ES in health care access, utilization and outcomes for Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (AA&NHPIs), and useful information to appropriately address these needs. More Details...

Enabling Services at Health Centers: Eliminating Disparities and Improving Quality: Challenges and Opportunities for Health Centers in Collecting Data on Enabling Services (2006). Resource Type: Publication. Description: This report describes a pilot study conducted by AAPCHO and four member health centers. Through this project, a uniform dataset on enabling services was created and a standardized method for collecting data was implemented. The data demonstrates that a high percentage of patients at health centers utilize enabling services (ES), and each user receives more than one ES. The data is able to provide information on the variations in utilization of enabling services and user characteristics at each health center. More Details...

Enabling Services at Community Health Centers (2010). Resource Type: Publication. Description: This report introduces the important role enabling services (ES) play in the delivery of high quality care for medically underserved Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (AA&NHPIs). It details the high utilization of such services and the impact they have on patients' health outcomes. It concludes with recommendations for establishing a nationally recognized standard for ES data collection and utilization, integrating ES into the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) model, and funding to sustain and ensure quality services. More Details...

En Tus Manos: Una Introduccion al Cancer de Piel para Promotores de Salud (2017). Resource Type: Publication. Description: This fact sheet is for outreach workers with information about skin cancer education and prevention. More Details...

En Tus Manos: Previendo el Cancer de Piel (2017). Resource Type: Publication. Description: This fact sheet is for agricultural workers with information about how to protect themselves from skin cancer. More Details...

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $6,375,000 with 0 percentage financed with non-governmental sources. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government. For more information, please visit HRSA.gov.