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Assessing Provider Satisfaction
And how to design health IT interventions to improve satisfaction and reduce burden, January 2020

Resource Topic: Workforce, Health Information Technology (HIT)/Data

Resource Subtopic: Leadership, Electronic Health Records (EHRs).

Year Developed: 2020

Resource Type: Publication

Primary Audience: PCAs
Secondary Audience: Administrative Staff C-Suite (CEOs, CFOs, CIOs, COOs, CMOs, etc)

Language: English

Developed by: HITEQ (See other resources developed by this organization).

Resource Summary: This resource puts forth several options for assessing provider satisfaction or burden, with a focus on health IT. Each provider assessment also includes information about cost and access. In addition to surveying providers, there is other information that can be assessed for baseline when planning an intervention to decrease burden. These can be used for pre– and post-intervention monitoring and evaluation. Finally, related research findings, including the overall relationship between EHR and provider satisfaction, regulatory and documentation requirements, the impact of training, provider autonomy and role in EHR design, and in-basket management, are described.

Resource Details: Provider satisfaction is of critical importance for health centers to promote safety and workforce stability. A 2013 survey found that dissatisfied physicians were 2-3 times more likely to leave medical practice than their more satisfied colleagues. This may be unsurprising given that another recent study found that physicians spend almost half of their day on the EHR and desk work. This resource puts forth several options for assessing provider satisfaction or burden, with a focus on health IT. Each provider assessment also includes information about cost and access. In addition to surveying providers, there is other information that can be assessed for baseline when planning an intervention to decrease burden. These can be used for pre– and post-intervention monitoring and evaluation; several such options are profiled in this resource. Finally, related research findings, including the overall relationship between EHR and provider satisfaction, regulatory and documentation requirements, the impact of training, provider autonomy and role in EHR design, and in-basket management, are described. These results are then translated into potential interventions that could be implemented to improve provider satisfaction or reduce provider burden.

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $6,375,000 with 0 percentage financed with non-governmental sources. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government. For more information, please visit HRSA.gov.