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Collecting Data On Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, And Pacific Islanders For Community Health Center Needs Assessments: A Learning Series - Part 1
Social Determinants of Health of Emerging Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islander (AA&NHPI) Populations by States

Resource Topic: HIT/Data
Resource Subtopic: Social Determinants of Health, Special and Vulnerable Populations, Policy and Advocacy, Research and Data

Year Developed: 2017

Resource Type: Archived Webinar

Primary Audience: Administrative Staff

Language: English

Developed by: Association of Asian Pacific Community Health Organizations (See other resources developed by this organization.)

Resource Summary: This webinar provides a data portrait of the fastest growing AA&NHPI populations by state with profiles of their social determinants of health characteristics. The five states are Arizona, Arkansas, Nevada, North Carolina, and North Dakota. The seven SDOH characteristics mentioned are educational attainment, foreign born, language spoken at home and ability to speak English, employment status, health insurance coverage, poverty level, and household characteristics. Collecting and having disaggregated data is important to better understand the unique barriers faced by AA&NHPIs since they represent more than 50 ethnic groups and over 100 languages. Health centers can use this data to develop more culturally and linguistically appropriate programs to better serve these communities.

Resource Details: This webinar is the first of a three part series of AAPCHO’s Needs Assessment Learning Series focused on data collection and Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (AA&NHPIs). This webinar provides a data portrait of the fastest growing AA&NHPI populations by state with profiles of their social determinants of health characteristics. It is important to understand the areas with the fastest growing rates of AA&NHPIs and their SDOH characteristics in order to bring greater awareness of needed health and culturally and linguistically appropriate services (CLAS).

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $6,375,000 with 0 percentage financed with non-governmental sources. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, HHS, or the U.S. Government. For more information, please visit HRSA.gov.